A Wearable Vital Signs Monitor for Single Site, Cuff-less Blood Pressure Measurements

Technology #15607

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Location at which the device may be carried
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Inventors
Professor Charles Sodini
Department of Electical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT
External Link (imes.mit.edu)
David He
Department of Electical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT
Eric Winokur
Department of Electical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT
Managed By
Ben Rockney
MIT Technology Licensing Officer
Patent Protection

Wearable Device for Continous Cardiac Monitoring

US Patent Pending 2013-0338460
Publications
A Wearable Vital Signs Monitor at the Ear for Continous Heart Rate and Pulse Transit Time Measurements
Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2012 Annual International Conference of the IEEE , August 28, 2012, p. 2724-2727
A Continuous, Wearable, and Wireless Heart Monitor using Head Ballistocardiogram (BCG) and Head Electrocardiogram (ECG
Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC, 2011 Annual International Conference of the IEEE, August 30, 2011, p. 4729-4732
An Ear-worn Continuous Ballistocardiogram (BCG) Sensor for Cardiovascular Monitoring
Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2012 Annual International Conference of the IEEE, August 28, 2012, p. 5030-5033
An Ear-Worn Vital Signs Monitor
IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, November, 2015, p. 2547-2552

Applications

This invention is a wearable physiological monitor which collects a pulsatile motion signal (MoCG), an electrocardiogram (ECG) (optional), and a photoplethysmogram (PPG) of the user in order to derive key vital signs.

Problems Addressed

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the U.S. In 2008, the economic burden associated with CVD in the U.S was $29.7 billion, and is expected to reach $1.117 trillion by 2030. There is a need to move from the current hospital-centric and reactive healthcare delivery systems to one that focuses on early detection and diagnosis through personalized and extended monitoring outside a hospital context.

Technology

The Inventors have created a monitor for measuring a pulsatile ballistographic motion signal (MoCG) that is delayed from, but the same as, the heartbeat of a user. This pulsatile signal is the result of a mechanical motion of portions of the body that occurs in response to blood being pumped during a heartbeat. The internal forces of blood cause a mechanical reaction that is externally measurable. This device is comprised of an accelerometer (and optionally a gyroscope) to measure MoCG and an optical sensor to collect photoplethysmogram (PPG) of the user.  Furthermore, the device has a circuit for collecting electrocardiogram (ECG) of the user (optional for blood pressure measurement). The data processor can calculate blood pressure, heart rate, stroke volume, and pre-ejection period for the user based on the measured ECG, PPG and MoCG of the user. The device includes a memory for storing data and a transmiter to trasmit data to a remote computing device. The system includes a module for providing sensory feedback to the user upon request. 

Advantages

  • Allows for continuous vital signs monitoring
  • Helps physicians assess the wearer's overall state of health and identify risks for CVD