Structured Spheres Generated by an In-Fibre Fluid Instability

Technology #15704

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Figure 1: Fluid capillary instabilities in multimaterial fibres as a route to size-tunable particle fabrication.Figure 2: Scalable fabrication of micro- and nano-scale spherical particles.Figure 3: Polymer-core/glass-shell spherical particle fabrication.Figure 4: Broken-symmetry Janus particle and ‘beach ball’ particle fabrication.
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Inventors
Professor Yoel Fink
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, MIT
External Link (dmse.mit.edu)
Professor Steven Johnson
Department of Mathematics, MIT
External Link (math.mit.edu)
Daosheng Deng
MIT
Xiangdong Liang
MIT
Managed By
Jim Freedman
MIT Technology Licensing Officer - Chemicals, Instruments, Consumer Products
Patent Protection

In-Fiber Particle Generation

US Patent Pending US 2013-0202888

In-Fiber Particle Generation

US Patent Pending

In-Fiber Particle Generation

US Patent Pending
Publications
Structured spheres generated by an in-fibre fluid instability
Nature, 26 July 2012, Nature 487, 463–467

Applications

This invention is used in a variety of applications such as drug delivery, chemical and biological catalysis and cosmetics.

Problem Addressed

Bottom-up approaches for forming particles are limited by particle coalescence and agglomeration during particle growth. Therefore, there is a need for efficient particle fabrication over a wide range of sizes, from a variety of materials, and in many different structures.  

Technology

This invention harnesses the inherent scalability of fiber production and in-fiber Plateau-Rayleigh capillary instability for the fabrication of uniformly sized, structure spherical particles spanning an exceptionally wide range of sizes.  Composite and spherical particles are produced by arranging a variety of structures and materials in a macroscopic scaled-up model of the fiber. These particles can include core-shell particles, two-compartment 'Janus' particles, and multi-sectioned 'beach ball' particles. 

Advantages 

  • The particles could span an exceptionally wide range of sizes (from 2 millimeters down to 20 nanometers)
  • Highly efficient process