Wetting Porous Coatings for Lubrication of Orthopedic Implants

Technology #15730

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Inventors
Professor Kripa Varanasi
Department of Mechanical Engineering, MIT
External Link (varanasi.mit.edu)
Alexander Slocum
Department of Mechanical Engineering, MIT
Adam Paxson
Department of Mechanical Engineering, MIT
David Smith
Department of Mechanical Engineering, MIT
Daniel Goodman
Department of Mechanical Engineering, MIT
Managed By
Christopher Noble
MIT Technology Licensing Officer - Clean and Renewable Energy
Patent Protection

Orthopaedic joints providing enhanced lubricity

US Patent Pending

Orthopaedic joints providing enhanced lubricity

US Patent 9,585,757

Applications

Orthopedic Implants.

Problem Addressed

In orthopedic implants, there are three lubrication regimes: boundary layer, hydrodynamic and elastohydrodynamic. Out of these three. boundary layer lubrication leads to the most wear of the implants. Therefore, to reduce wear and increase the lifetime of the implants, it is important to find better methods of boundary layer lubrication. 

Technology

This technology relates to lubrication of metallic surfaces for orthopedic implants using nanotexturing via etching with NaOH.  By nanotexturing, the normally hydrophilic surfaces of components in relative motion can be made super-hydrophilic and can encapsulate fluid by capillary action. At this length scale, the capillary forces dominate and can be used to ensure that a layer of fluid is always present on the surface of the material. In this way, the material becomes "self-lubricating." Application of this coating to orthopedic implants can reduce component wear.

Advantages


  • Reduced component wear in both the metal coated component and the adjacent parts
  • Increased prosthesis lifetimes
  • Improved patient outcomes