Nanoparticle Thin-Film Coatings for Enhancement of Boiling Heat Transfer

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Nanoparticle Thin-Film Coatings for Enhancement of Boiling Heat Transfer
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Inventors
Professor Michael Rubner
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, MIT
External Link (web.mit.edu)
Professor Robert Cohen
Department of Chemical Engineering, MIT
External Link (web.mit.edu)
Professor Jacopo Buongiorno
Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, MIT
External Link (web.mit.edu)
Lin-wen Hu
Nuclear Reactor Lab, MIT
Eric Forrest
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, MIT
Erik Williamson
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, MIT
Managed By
Jim Freedman
MIT Technology Licensing Officer - Chemicals, Instruments, Consumer Products
Patent Protection

Nanoparticle Thin-Film Coatings for Enhancement of Boiling Heat Transfer

US Patent 8,701,927

Nanoparticle depostion to render surfaces superhydrophilic and improve two-phase heat transfer.

Applications

The invention can be used to improve the power density of heat transfer for systems such as electronic devices, chemical reactors, refrigeration systems, boilers, etc.

Problem Addressed

Heat transfer process in electronic devices and other systems is inefficient due to low critical heat flux and low heat-transfer coefficient.

Technology

A wettability improvement at a surface is thought to be responsible for a critical heat flux (CHF) enhancement, while changes in surface roughness are thought to be responsible for changes in the heat-transfer coefficient. The invention uses nanoparticle-based thin-film coatings on engineering surfaces to increase the boiling heat transfer coefficient and the boiling CHF. Using layer-by-layer assembly method, a superhydrophilic thin film is formed on the metal surface of a boiler vessel to alter the wettability and roughness of the surface, which in turn, changes the boiling behavior at the surface.

Advantages

  • Increases heat-transfer coefficient and CHF
  • Maintains the operating heat flux below CHF
  • Higher power density and hence increases economic benefits